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Available Horses
Jack B Quick
Available Foals
18-012 National Treasure 18-028 Rally 18-029 Cinch 18-030 Quest 18-032 Out of the Blue 18-033 Good Clean Fun 18-034 Radar Love 18-035 Little Texas Twister 18-031 Prince Joseph " Jo-Jo" 18-036 Sensation 18-037 Diplomatic Immunity 18-038 Searcher 18-039 Flash Back 18-040 Cupcake 18-041 Hot Rod 18-042 Lawless
Recovery Barn
Last Chance Corral's Recovery BarnThe Recovery Barn was, and still is, a part of our local history.  It was originally located 13 miles east of Athens on Rte. 50.  The barn was built in 1893 by Harlow Calvert after he escaped from a prisoner of war camp in Andersonville, Georgia.  The barn over the years came to sport rival tobacco companies' signs; one of only four barns to have such a feature, so I've been told.  It was on the Historical Register, but even that could not save her from progress.

The widening of Rte. 50 made her demise imminent, the LCC tried to intervene on the barns behalf with little results.  Two weeks from her scheduled date with the bull dozers, a call from ODOT, a reprieve from the Governor!!  The LCC was give two weeks to dismantle and move the grand old barn.  Another labor of love, and a hurried one to boot!

We were able to move the barn and its colossal beams in the nick of time.  There were literally dozers nipping at our heals.  Though we were unable to save her stone foundation; we were able to save the corner stone with the date and Harlow's initials chiseled into its surface.

The Barn now stands safely at the LCC.  We affectionately call her the Recovery Barn.  The barn boasts 15'X15' stalls; which are perfect for horses recovering from surgeries or injuries.  Recovering horses can sometimes spend a stretch of up to four weeks or more in one of these stalls.  Therefore we made sure that they were roomy with lots of windows for fresh air and sunshine.  The perfect environment for recovery!!

I am glad to have this space and proud that we were able to preserve this piece of history.  I'm sure Harlow rests easy knowing that his barn is still in operation.